adopt meWhat Can I Expect After I Adopt?

Your new dog likely comes with a mysterious background. While you may never know the circumstances that ultimately led your new friend to the shelter, then to your home, it’s important that you understand how those circumstances might impact the animal’s behavior once you bring him home, and how to address those behaviors if they occur.Some rescued dogs will be content and confident right from the point of adoption. But it’s not unusual for a rescued dog to be anxious and ill at ease in his new home—pacing, vocalizing and the like. This is normal behavior. Your new dog has been uprooted and doesn’t yet realize his new home is permanent. Plenty of loving attention should help put him at ease.

what to expectIf your new dog has a history of abuse or was never properly socialized, he may have fear issues, which manifest, for example, in a fear of men, loud noises or other dogs. These dogs do best in calmer, quieter environments. They may benefit greatly from working with a trainer or behaviorist who can help with socialization and confidence-building exercises. Look for a trainer who uses positive training techniques.

Prepare for the possibility of house-soiling accidents at first, even with adult dogs who were previously house trained. The best way to prevent accidents is to keep your dog close to you and provide ample opportunities to go outside to eliminate. Don’t leave your pet alone in the house until you have established a schedule and routine for going outdoors to eliminate.

Above all, be patient. Give your new dog time to adjust. It can take a week or two for a rescued animal to feel comfortable and secure in his new home, with members of his new family. After an adjustment period, the best qualities of your adopted dog will begin to emerge.
And that’s when the fun really begins!

And we promise….it’s so worth the wait.


Adoption Resourcesadopt

 

Crate Training: The Benefits for You & Your Dog

First 30 Days with Your New Friend

Supply List for Your New Dog

ASPCA Tips on Handling Separation Anxiety